Aasif Mandvi On Life As A ‘No Land’s Man’ And Impressing Jon Stewart

November 3, 2014 - accent chair

Aasif Mandvi is best famous as The Daily Show‘s comparison Muslim correspondent, though he insists that when he was hired he was “a terrible instance of a Muslim.”

“The suspicion that we had anything to do with vocalization about Islam or about a Muslim universe was customarily absurd to my family. … we hadn’t been to a mosque in like 10 years,” he tells Fresh Air‘s Terry Gross. “I know a Gospel according to Mark improved than we know any sura in a Quran.”

Still, when a show’s writers had any secular questions or questions about Islam, Mandvi says, he’d fake he’d know a answer.

The Daily Show writers are impossibly intelligent and unequivocally good plugged-in though spasmodic they would need me for certain specific things, and I’d be like, ‘Yeah, we totally know how to do that; we can solve that problem,’ ” Mandvi says. “And afterwards I’d be like, ‘Mom?’ ”

Mandvi was innate in India and changed to England when he was unequivocally young. There, he went to a British boarding propagandize where students went to church each Sunday. When Mandvi was 16, he and his family changed to Florida.

“I suspicion my days were customarily going to be spent unresolved out on a beach and my partner was going to be Miss Teen USA and my best crony will be a dolphin,” Mandvi says. “So we had this totally impractical suspicion of what America was — though we wanted to be there.”

In No Land’s Man, a new collection of personal essays, Mandvi writes about his behaving career, his time on The Daily Show and his life as an immigrant.


Interview Highlights

On a stereotypical roles he auditioned for early in his career

It was this arrange of normal — cab drivers, a deli guy. … One of a initial auditions we had in New York was for a blurb where we had to go in and try-out to be a lizard charmer. … It was possibly some bank blurb or something where they wanted a male desirable a snake. … we remember they wanted to know if we indeed knew how to lizard charm. we wanted a pursuit so badly that we said, “Well, we know, I’m Indian, so it’s substantially in my DNA. we could substantially figure it out,” since we was so desperate. They wanted to know if we owned a turban since they didn’t unequivocally have someone who knew how to tie a turban. we consider we pronounced something like, “No, we don’t possess a turban since if we do possess a turban, we kind of don’t leave home though it. You wear it.” we didn’t get a part.

On since he was demure to try-out for The Daily Show

I had finished this kind of thing before where we had left to David Letterman and finished a voice of Saddam Hussein, or like a tech support male on Jimmy Kimmel, we know, and we suspicion [The Daily Show job] was going to be one of these one-off things where we was going to be sanctimonious to fly around on a runner or scream “Death to America” in an Arab accent. …

What had happened is they had created a Middle East correspondent, a match indeed from a Middle East, and afterwards they satisfied that they didn’t have one so they indispensable to try-out people. So we came in that day, customarily as a unchanging audition, to try-out for this one-off square they had written. …

I was a fan of The Daily Show. we watched it. we never illusory being on it, though we figured we would customarily go down there and do my best Stephen Colbert impression. And we theory it worked since Jon [Stewart] hired me right on a mark and afterwards we was on a uncover that night before we could even tell anyone that we was on The Daily Show. And afterwards we was literally on a atmosphere and people were pursuit and being like, “Did we customarily see we on The Daily Show?” It happened unequivocally fast. Then we theory Jon favourite me and he wanted me to keep entrance back.

On a “Paki-bashing” he gifted as a child in England

“Paki-bashing” was kind of this tenure that was used in ubiquitous to flog adult anyone who was from a Indian subcontinent. [In] Bradford, [England,] specifically, there were a lot of Pakistanis there — even currently it has a unequivocally vast Pakistani population. You customarily got lumped into that thing. Yeah, it was something that we experienced, removing chased from a train stop after propagandize by English kids [and in] boarding propagandize being targeted for praying to what they call “Allah-wallah-ding-dong.” It was that kind of thing. There was a lot of targeting of South Asians.

England has an engaging attribute with a Indian subcontinent since [of] a years of colonization and a story between a dual places. And so it always felt mocking that for a place that had colonized India … afterwards those same people were now colonizing England, re-colonizing it, retreat colonizing it. To a indicate that currently a inhabitant plate of Great Britain is duck tikka masala, we know? … we don’t know if that’s indeed true, though we know that there is a Facebook page that is dedicated to creation that happen. … You can get samosas in any pub in England today.

On Indian contra American ideas of marriage

For my parents’ generation, a suspicion was not that matrimony was about some kind of idealized, regretful love; it was a partnership. It’s about formulating family; it’s about formulating offspring. Indian enlightenment is radically many some-more of a “we” culture. It’s a village enlightenment where we do what’s best for a village — we procreate. And afterwards in America and in a West we have this individualism, this suspicion of my possess personal fulfillment. And there’s this existential predicament in America and in a West of like, “Who am I?” formed on this acid for particular fulfillment, that we don’t indispensably have in a East in a same way, since you’re kind of told what to do. …

It is mocking that it doesn’t matter how successful we am in any other capacity, ultimately, my parents’ pen is “Do we have a wife?” and “Do we have children?”

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, revisit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

TERRY GROSS, HOST:

My guest, Aasif Mandvi, is best famous as “The Daily Show’s” Senior Muslim Correspondent. But he insists that when he assimilated a show, he was a terrible instance of a Muslim and knew 0 about a news, solely what he schooled from examination “The Daily Show.” Mandvi has created a new collection of personal essays called “No Land’s Man.” He writes about “The Daily Show” and his life is an immigrant. He was innate in India, though shortly after, changed with his family to England. They changed to a U.S. when Mandvi was a teenager. He also writes about his behaving career. He starred in and co-wrote a 2009 film “Today’s Special,” that was blending from his off-Broadway one-man show. Let’s start with a shave from “The Daily Show” that’s an instance of a kind of fun Aasif Mandvi is infrequently called on to do in formidable times. This was promote final year, one week after a Boston Marathon bombing, customarily after a photos of a suspects were released. Here’s Jon Stewart introducing him.

(SOUNDBITE OF TV SHOW, “THE DAILY SHOW”)

JON STEWART: But for all a conjecture, there are now a few things we do know for certain about a apprehension suspect. For some-more on that, we’re assimilated by “Daily Show” Senior Terror Analyst Aasif Mandvi live in Boston. Aasif, interjection so many for fasten us.

AASIF MANDVI: Thank you, John.

(APPLAUSE)

STEWART: You’ve been adult in Boston. You have been following this story from a unequivocally beginning. What can we tell us about a suspects so far?

MANDVI: Well, we can tell we this, Jon – when they initial expelled those photos, Muslims all over America pronounced appreciate God they are not Muslim.

(LAUGHTER)

STEWART: Right, right, though afterwards on – obviously, on Friday, we found out they were Muslim.

MANDVI: Yeah, though not Muslim-Muslim.

(LAUGHTER)

STEWART: You mean, ’cause they’re white?

MANDVI: Well, not customarily white – a whitest of white. we mean, they were literally from Caucasia.

STEWART: we mean, though obviously, in people’s eyes, it still – it can still couple Islam to terrorism. we mean, since does it make a disproportion that they’re white?

MANDVI: Well, since it means no one is going to be yelling during me on a travel for a subsequent month, OK? we meant they’ll still contend hey, Kumar, can we get your autograph?

STEWART: Right, we get that.

MANDVI: I’m excellent with that. Now a bigots have to get creative. Good fitness entrance adult with slurs for Chechens. Go behind where we came from, Ushanka head. we mean, right?

(LAUGHTER)

STEWART: Is that a genuine thing? Or is that customarily a offence we finished up?

MANDVI: Yeah, that’s their particular fur hat, Jon. we had to demeanour it adult on Wikipedia. That’s how tough it is going to be.

STEWART: I’m not certain that entrance adult with new secular stereotypes is unequivocally a many prolific use of a time right now.

MANDVI: Well, we got a improved idea, Jon? Because we can’t make heads or tails of this mess, OK? The some-more we learn about these guys, a harder it is to get a hoop on them.

STEWART: But we know they’re Chechen-American.

MANDVI: Right, though that doesn’t unequivocally assistance us during all. Because to Americans, Chechnya competence as good be a suburb of Narnia. Look, for 12 years, Americans have been told a good small story about who a bad guys are and what they demeanour like. And then, along come these two. They’re Muslim, though they’re white, they’re immigrants, though they’re Americans, they’re athletes, they’re stoners. Jahar is a monster, nonetheless he’s kind of a hottie.

STEWART: All right, we get that.

(LAUGHTER)

STEWART: They’re from a suburbs, nonetheless they like a hip-hop.

MANDVI: No, no I’m flattering certain that what one is typical. But a indicate is, there’s too many going on with these guys. Even a guy’s name – Dzhokhar Tsarnaev it’s like he managed to fist each minute of a alphabet in there. And we can anagram it to spell anything from sincere jeopardy handle to Zac Efron sucks to Jell-O Pudding Pops. we mean, can’t get some-more American than that.

STEWART: Jell-O Pudding Pops? Okay a final dual – Aasif – I’m flattering certain during slightest dual of those were not indeed anagrams of that guy’s name.

MANDVI: we do not know how anagrams work Jon.

GROSS: (Laughter) Aasif Mandvi acquire to FRESH AIR.

MANDVI: Thank you.

GROSS: It’s unequivocally such a pleasure to have we on a show. You write in your collection of personal essays “No Land’s Man” that when we were asked to try-out for “The Daily Show” we were demure to do it. How could we have been demure to do it?

MANDVI: (Laughter) You know, it was a crazy array of events that happened where fundamentally we got this call for “The Daily Show” – we know, we arrange of compared “The Daily Show” with, like, stand-up comedy people. And, we know, I’d finished this kind of thing before where we had left to like David Letterman and finished a voice of Saddam Hussein or played like a tech support male on Jimmy Kimmel or something we know? And we suspicion it was going to be like one of these one-off kind of things where we was going to be sanctimonious to – arrange of fly around on a runner or scream genocide to America in an Arab accent or something, we know, and we suspicion that’s what it was going to be. And afterwards we realized, oh they’re indeed looking for a correspondent. And what had happened was they had created a Middle East match – like a match indeed from a Middle East and afterwards they satisfied that they didn’t have one. And so they indispensable to try-out people. And so we came in that day to try-out for this one-off square that they had created and afterwards auditioned for it. It went, we guess, unequivocally good since we fundamentally customarily – we didn’t know what to do. we was a fan of “The Daily Show” we watched it, we know, we never illusory being on it, though we figured we would customarily go down there and do my best Stephen Colbert clarity and we theory it worked since Jon hired me right there on a spot. And afterwards we was on a uncover that night before we could even tell anyone that we was hired on a “The Daily Show.” And afterwards we was literally on a atmosphere and people were pursuit and being like did we customarily see we on “The Daily Show?” You know so it was customarily – it happened unequivocally fast. And then, we theory Jon just, we know, favourite me and so he customarily wanted me to keep entrance behind and so afterwards he would customarily keep on mouth-watering me to come behind and do things and chats and things on a show. And afterwards we did that for a few months before they finally arrange of offering me a full-time contract.

GROSS: What was that initial piece?

MANDVI: That initial square that we did that is indeed still we consider one of my favorite pieces I’ve ever finished on a uncover that was about Hezbollah Israel dispute in 2006 and it was unequivocally pointed. It was a beautifully crafted square of fun and it’s a uncanny thing to contend though it had a fun in there about 9/11 and we remember a assembly arrange of shouting though also kind of not meaningful how to respond to that fun and it was customarily so – and we remember a tragedy after we did this fun on a atmosphere and there was this tangible pant in a audience, though they were also laughing. And we suspicion oh, wow, that is something that is not being pronounced in a Zeitgeist.

GROSS: So we write that when we started to work on “The Daily Show” your father gave we this recommendation – if Jon Stewart asks we any questions or your opinions about Islam don’t contend a word, customarily have him call your mother, she knows everything. Don’t disparage your whole family. That’s genuine certainty boosting advice.

MANDVI: Which afterwards he went on to contend by a way, we’re unequivocally unapproachable of we – this is an implausible accomplishment. So it was like customarily arrange of followed by that, we know, p.s.

GROSS: Did we have to call your mom for recommendation on anything?

MANDVI: Occasionally we did. You know, we did call my relatives when things would come up. You know, we was mostly – “The Daily Show” writers are impossibly intelligent and unequivocally good plugged in though spasmodic they would need me for certain specific things, we know, ethnically or about Islam or even India or – we know things like that where they would be like oh we don’t know how to contend this or – and that is infrequently when we would be like yeah, we totally know how to do that we can solve that problem. And that we would be like mom? You know – so yeah that happened a few times, though we meant it’s clearly ironically named however it is arrange of a comparison Muslim match or, we know, a suspicion that we had anything to do with like a vocalization about Islam or about a Muslim universe or anything like that was customarily absurd to my family, know? (LAUGHTER)

GROSS: (LAUGHTER) Why was it so absurd to them?

MANDVI: Well, since we hadn’t been to a mosque in like 10 years we know and…

GROSS: …Oh wait and we went to a Methodist Boys’ School when we lived in..

MANDVI: …and we went to a Methodist – yeah we actually, we know, am unapproachable to contend that we know a Gospel according to Mark improved than we know any surah in a Quran, we know? It’s an mocking thing about being an newcomer kid, we know, flourishing adult – ’cause we grew adult in a UK and went to a British boarding propagandize and we would go to chapel each Sunday morning. And we’d indeed have eremite studies and eremite studies means Christian studies where we investigate a Bible.

GROSS: So here’s a associated doubt – when – after Trey Parker and Matt Stone from “South Park” were being threatened with genocide since they did a “South Park” partial that a Prophet Muhammad figured into and it looked like it was a Prophet in a costume, though it incited out to be Santa Claus in a dress – though that didn’t stop a genocide threats. And so “The Daily Show” did something on that and of course, we were a match for it. And we write in your book that before doing that square Jon Stewart asked we well, can we uncover a Prophet Muhammad on a “The Daily Show?” And we immediately responded…

MANDVI: we pronounced no, we don’t consider that’s a good idea. And we didn’t contend it since we was frightened – we customarily suspicion it was agitator and kind of nonessential to do it that way. And so we indeed came adult with a many some-more artistic way. He indeed pronounced to me can we have Muhammad? And we pronounced no. And then, he pronounced what about Jesus? And we was like Jesus loves a camera, we should totally have Jesus, Jesus loves being on a air. He loves it. You know, so customarily have Jesus on there, yes. But, we know, we indeed did consider about it for a small while and afterwards motionless not to go down that highway and customarily have me come out and do a discuss with John during a table articulate about my possess personal feelings about it.

GROSS: So do we consider your relatives would’ve been annoyed by it? we mean, they’re some-more committed practicing Muslims than we are. And were we meditative of that? Were we meditative like – we know, what would my relatives think?

MANDVI: Yeah. we consider my relatives would be annoyed by it. we consider that, we know, annoyed is maybe a – uncomfortable, we know? If we select to be a Muslim afterwards we trust that it is on some turn wrong to uncover a design of a Prophet Muhammad.

GROSS: If you’re customarily fasten us my guest is Aasif Mandvi who is a match for a “The Daily Show.” He’s customarily behind from a leave since he’s also sharpened a new HBO array that he’s co-starring in called “The Brink.” And he has a new collection of personal essays called “No Land’s Man”. Let’s take a brief mangle – afterwards we’ll speak some more. This is FRESH AIR.

(MUSIC)

GROSS: This is FRESH AIR. And if you’re customarily fasten us, my guest is Aasif Mandvi. He’s a match for “The Daily Show” and now he has a new collection of personal essays called “No Land’s Man.” You write that we spent a initial year on “The Daily Show” assured we were a wrong male for a job. Why did we consider that?

MANDVI: Well, because, we know, we came from a unequivocally opposite arrange of credentials and extraction from a people who were on “The Daily Show,” we know? we was an actor. we was arrange of – a irony is that I’ve finished as many thespian work in my career as comedic work and we don’t unequivocally consider of myself as a comedian. So firstly, there was that, that is – we was like, we know, I’m an actor and what am we my doing here? And secondly, it was kind of one of those jobs that unequivocally no one can learn you. You know, there’s nobody else arrange of doing that. There’s no propagandize that we can go to and learn how to be a “Daily Show” match and how to speak people and, we know, radically leave your essence outward a doorway and go in there and kind of, we know, destroy people’s lives sometimes. But, we know, Samantha Bee pronounced to me when we initial started on a show, she was like no – there is no – a customarily approach you’ll learn this pursuit is by doing this job. And so we kind of – there was that initial year where we was customarily like oh my God, like, what am we doing? You know, we would go out and it was unequivocally – in training how to navigate those interviews and, we know, since they’re not like – they’re not like even a normal interview. You know, they’re unequivocally specific. And so…

GROSS: They’re unequivocally not.

MANDVI: Right, so, we know, though afterwards we do learn and we arrange of, we know, we figure it out. And we think, we know, that was – yeah, so we did. we spent a initial year meditative like I’m customarily a finish fraud. What am we doing, we know?

GROSS: So we customarily walked me in to a subsequent shave we wish to play.

MANDVI: OK.

GROSS: This was after a Supreme Court struck down pivotal tools of a Voting Rights Act that stable electorate from secular discrimination. And a infancy preference pronounced that those protections were no longer necessary. And right after that several states started instituting new voting restrictions. So you’re in this shave articulate with a Republican patrol chair in Buncombe County, North Carolina. His name is Don Yelton. You’re articulate to him about a new voter ID laws there. So this is from “The Daily Show” with my guest, Aasif Mandvi.

(SOUNDBITE OF TV SHOW, “THE DAILY SHOW”)

MANDVI: North Carolina patrol authority and GOP executive cabinet member Don Yelton thinks his state’s new voting restrictions are customarily fine.

DON YELTON: What’s going to occur as a outcome of this law, a routine is going to some-more integrity. Right here in Buncombe County, there’s always one or dual that voted twice a year. They don’t know…

MANDVI: One or dual million people?

YELTON: No, one or dual people.

MANDVI: And that’s one or dual out of how many?

YELTON: That’s customarily one or dual out of 60,000.

MANDVI: So statistically there is adequate voter rascal to lean 0 elections.

YELTON: That’s not a point.

MANDVI: The indicate is that voter rascal does customarily hardly exist, while racism, according to a Supreme Court, is a thing of a past.

YELTON: The bottom line is a law is not racist.

MANDVI: Of march a law’s not racist, and we are not racist.

(LAUGHTER)

YELTON: Well, I’ve been called a extremist before. Let me tell we something – we don’t demeanour like me, though we consider I’ve treated we a same as we would anybody else.

MANDVI: Right.

YELTON: As a matter of fact, one of my best friends is black.

MANDVI: So one of your best friends…

YELTON: One of my best friends.

MANDVI: …Is black.

YELTON: Yes.

MANDVI: And there’s more.

YELTON: When we was a immature man, we didn’t call a black a black, we called him a negro. we had a design one time of Obama sitting on a branch as a magician alloy and we posted that on Facebook and we was creation fun of my white half of Obama, not a black half. And now we have a black chairman regulating a tenure [bleep] this, [bleep] that and it’s OK for them to do it.

MANDVI: You know that we can hear you, right?

YELTON: Yeah.

MANDVI: Oh OK, we know that. You know that we can hear you.

YELTON: Yeah.

MANDVI: OK, all right.

And afterwards we found out a genuine reason for a law.

YELTON: The law is going to flog a Democrats in a butt.

MANDVI: Wow. An executive GOP cabinet member customarily certified that this law isn’t designed to harm black people; it’s designed to harm Democrats.

YELTON: If it hurts a garland of college kids that’s too idle to get out adult off their bohonkus and go get a print ID, so be it.

MANDVI: Right, right.

YELTON: If it hurts a whites, so be it. If it hurts a garland of idle blacks that wants a supervision to give them everything, so be it.

MANDVI: And it customarily so happens that a lot of those people opinion Democrat.

YELTON: Gee.

MANDVI: That’s right. To presumably forestall one or dual cases of fraud, this law could conceal hundreds of thousands of tangible voters.

YELTON: we can’t trust we got that many foolish people in North Carolina and people that don’t know how to follow directions and go down there and get a print ID for giveaway during a DMV. Do we wish those people picking your president?

MANDVI: No, we positively don’t wish foolish people picking a president, or Democrats apparently.

GROSS: That’s Aasif Mandvi on “The Daily Show.” He is my guest and he has a new collection of personal essays called “No Land’s Man.” Aasif, that was unequivocally customarily remarkable. What were a consequences for a chairman we were interviewing?

MANDVI: Well, Don Yelton, who was a cabinet member down in North Carolina, was dismissed a subsequent day after that speak aired. You know, and it was one of those things where, we know, on one palm we consider we had a GOP down there in North Carolina reaching out to African-American electorate and this male entrance on radio and regulating a N-word and observant what he said. And, we know – and he, by a way, stood by all he said. He was on a radio a subsequent day articulate about how a GOP were gutless and, we know, didn’t have a vast adequate tent we theory to embody racists and bigots as well. You know, though we consider also there was a clarity of like a GOP is arrange of banishment him, we know, since it was kind of roughly a opinion – it was like listen, you’re not authorised to contend that on television. Come on, we know? Yeah, we can consider that, though not out loud.

GROSS: Did we know he would do that?

MANDVI: No, we had no idea. We didn’t know – we know, he was clearly dogmatic and we knew he’d be a good interview. We didn’t know that he would go into this whole thing, we know, about these secular things. And so it was unequivocally – we know, and those are a moments that we live for as a “Daily Show” correspondent. You know, that’s kind of like – when that’s happening, you’re customarily like yes, appreciate you. And afterwards it customarily became my pursuit customarily to arrange of lay behind and let it occur and not interrupt, we know?

GROSS: So we consider my favorite partial was after he describes carrying a Obama as a magician alloy print and articulate about how some of his friends – best friends were black and that…

MANDVI: Right, right.

GROSS: …Racist – now, oh, we had been called a extremist – all that stuff. You say, we know that we can hear you, right?

MANDVI: Right.

GROSS: Did we come in prepared with that line, or was that customarily right off a tip of your head?

MANDVI: No, we – yeah, that was not a prepared line since we didn’t know he was going to go down that highway during all, so that was customarily a customarily thing we could consider to contend because, we know, we seem to remember customarily feeling like, we know, he contingency know. we mean, we consider when we remember it now, we consider we – there was a partial of me that was customarily seeking utterly earnestly, we know, these cameras are on and you’re observant this out loud, we know. Like, we know, it roughly seemed like he was carrying an inner monologue.

GROSS: So did he know – did Yelton know “The Daily Show?” And did he know he was expected to not come out looking good?

MANDVI: we don’t consider he unequivocally watched “The Daily Show.”

GROSS: So what’s your pursuit there? Like, we pronounced in some of these interviews we have to leave your essence during a door…

MANDVI: Right, right, yeah.

GROSS: …Like, do we feel like oh, we should unequivocally prep him that this is customarily going to be a disaster for him? This is…

MANDVI: Well, we know…

GROSS: Like, what do we tell him?

MANDVI: We don’t distortion to people. We tell – we know, they know what uncover they’re on. They know that we’re going to – they know what we’re going to speak about – so we don’t consider he was a “Daily Show” watcher. He substantially was informed with a “Daily Show,” though we honestly, we know, in articulate to him, we don’t consider he cared. we consider he felt totally right.

GROSS: Aasif Mandvi will be behind in a second half of a show. His new collection of personal essays is called “No Land’s Man.” I’m Terry Gross and this is FRESH AIR.

(MUSIC)

GROSS: This is FRESH AIR. I’m Terry Gross, behind with

Aasif Mandvi. He’s a “Daily Show” match who’s played a purpose of comparison Muslim match and comparison apprehension correspondent. He’s returned to “The Daily Show” after a leave of deficiency that he took to fire a initial deteriorate of a new HBO array “The Brink,” that he costars in. It’s scheduled to premiere subsequent year. Mandvi has a new book of personal essays called “No Land’s Man.” That’s about his behaving career and his life as an immigrant.

You were innate in Mumbai, that was afterwards Bombay – was it still Bombay when we were born?

MANDVI: It was Bombay when we was innate there, yes. It’s turn now Mumbai, yes.

GROSS: And afterwards when we were about 1 or customarily before that your family changed to England from India. Why did your family move?

MANDVI: You know, my father got a pursuit during Bradford University in textiles. And he came for – we guess, we know, since do people immigrate? – like, for a improved life to find, we know, a new world. And, we know, we consider he always – he saw it as an opportunity. And so yeah so we came to this spark mining city in a north of England and that’s where we grew up.

GROSS: Was he training during a University?

MANDVI: No. He was operative in research. And afterwards he arrange of gave that adult to turn a businessman and finished adult owning a dilemma shop.

GROSS: What did he sell in a store?

MANDVI: It was fundamentally like a bodega. It was fundamentally – what? – in England they call them news agency. You know, he sole publishing and candy to, we know, old, British people. (Laughter).

GROSS: Were we means to see any of a pornography?

MANDVI: Sure. Yeah, it was adult there on a small stand, we know. But yeah, we know, that’s what we sold. It was kind of candy and cigarettes and publishing and…

GROSS: That’s like a bullion cave for a boy. (Laughter). Right?

MANDVI: Yes, yes, yes. we consider we detected my first, we know, my initial design of a unprotected lady was arrange of unctuous a demeanour during one of those magazines that was in my dad’s store.

GROSS: Your relatives had an organised marriage. How did your father feel about offering pornography?

MANDVI: You know, look, during a finish of a day we are Ghodratis (ph). And if anybody out there knows what Ghodratis are, we are during a finish of a day business people. And we make income in whatever approach we can. So, we know, for my father it was essentially, like, if this is what they wish to buy this is what I’m going to sell, we know.

GROSS: (Laughter). OK. So afterwards we went to a Methodist boarding propagandize where we schooled some-more about a Christian Bible than we schooled – than we knew about Islam. Did we feel like an alien during a boarding school?

MANDVI: Yeah. Very much. we mean, we know, this was in a ’70s and there was a lot of injustice towards South Asians and there was a lot of hazing and bullying and injustice that unequivocally substantially finished me in some approach in terms of, like, wanting to get out of there – we know?

GROSS: Get out of that propagandize or get out of England?

MANDVI: Get out of that propagandize and also when we motionless to leave England we could not have been happier. we was arrange of like – America seemed like a land of event and, we know, it was Hollywood to me. It was – we consider when we changed to Florida we suspicion that my days were customarily going to be spent unresolved out on a beach and my partner was going to be Miss Teen USA and my best crony would be a dolphin. You know, so we had this, like, totally impractical suspicion of what America was. But we wanted to be there, we know, we wanted to be partial of it. It was, we mean, we grew adult on American cocktail enlightenment so all that we fantasized about to get out of this arrange of disciplined universe of Bradford was about America. So when we motionless to pierce there we was on a plane.

GROSS: One of a things we left behind when we left England was a countenance Paki-bashing.

MANDVI: Yes.

GROSS: As in bashing a Pakistani. So, we don’t know, were we ever directly unprotected to that? And would it have been useful to say, forgive me, I’m not Pakistani, I’m Indian? Would that have saved you? Would it have finished a difference?

MANDVI: (Laughter). You know, for anybody who’s ever been on a other finish of, like, secular assault proof is not something that can be used. You know, it’s not like we can be like, forgive me, we trust that ethnically you’ve got me rather churned up, we know.

(LAUGHTER)

MANDVI: we don’t consider it unequivocally ever works. It’s never a strategy. But Paki- bashing was kind of this tenure that was used in ubiquitous to flog adult anyone that was from a Indian subcontinent. And, we know – and Bradford privately there were a lot of Pakistanis there. You know, even currently it has a unequivocally vast Pakistani population. So, we know, it was – we customarily got lumped in to that thing. And, yeah, it was something that we gifted – removing chased home from a train stop after propagandize by English kids, boarding school, being targeted for praying to, we know, what they call Allah wallah ding dong, we know. And so it was that kind of thing, we know, like, there was unequivocally a lot of targeting of South Asians. And, we know, England has an engaging attribute with a Indian subcontinent since a years of colonization and a history, we know, between a dual places. And so it was – felt mocking to me that, we know, for a place that had colonized India and afterwards those same people were now colonizing England. (Laughter). You know, re-colonizing it and arrange of reverse-colonizing it to a indicate that today, we know, a inhabitant plate of Great Britain is Chicken Tikka Masala, we know.

GROSS: Is that true?

MANDVI: we don’t know if that’s indeed true, though we know that there is a Facebook page that is dedicated to creation that happen, and it might’ve already happened we don’t know. But we can get samosas in any pub in England today, flattering much. So, we know, “Gunga Din” has come back.

GROSS: That is a good thing. we mean, British food was not famous for…

MANDVI: Right accurately we sum a spice. We brought a spice.

GROSS: Yeah, no, exactly, exactly. One of my favorite stories in a book was when we changed to America. And how aged were we when we moved?

MANDVI: we was 16.

GROSS: OK. That your father (laughter) your father motionless that when we did highway trips that we should all wear IHOP, International House of Pancakes, T-shirts, though to have it contend on a bottom International House of Patel since that’s, like, a common Indian name. What was a indicate of this?

MANDVI: Well, we know, again like we pronounced we are Ghodratis and there’s 0 that Ghodratis like some-more than a bargain.

(LAUGHTER)

MANDVI: And so for my relatives it was all about removing a understanding and, we know, my father came to America and he listened of this judgment of brunch. And we remember, we know, him articulate about this idea. He didn’t utterly know what it was. And he suspicion it was this other dish that existed between breakfast and lunch. He was kind of like – we remember he arrange of was like America has so many food that between breakfast and lunch they have to stop and eat again. They have brunch. You know, and it was so – it’s a breakfast and lunch combined, brunch. And he suspicion it was, like, this thing, we know, so he was unequivocally vehement about this third dish that existed in a center of a day. It was totally authorised it was, like, a authorised dish that we could have, we know. we mean, clearly it wasn’t a customarily reason he came to America, though we consider it positively honeyed a pot for him.

GROSS: So with a IHOP T-shirts – a International House of Patel T-shirts – a suspicion was that we would go to IHOPs for your dishes when we were on a highway outing and they would give we a bonus since we were wearing – were they ostensible to assume that we had your possess IHOP franchise?

MANDVI: we consider it was customarily some-more code faithfulness or customarily a artistry of it that would safeguard us some kind of discount. And customarily it worked, we know, so it was good.

GROSS: Did we ask for a bonus or did they customarily offer?

MANDVI: Oh, no. It was customarily something that was intimated. (Laughter).

GROSS: And Patel is customarily Hindu name.

MANDVI: Patel is a Hindu name. We are Muslims. You know, a other South Asian congregation of these restaurants would be confounded to know that, we know, my father would – since my grandparents would be with us and that my father would guaranty off his Muslim in-laws as Hindus customarily so that he could get giveaway pancakes, we know?

GROSS: If you’re customarily fasten us my guest is Aasif Mandvi and he’s a match on “The Daily Show.” He’s a costar of a new array that starts subsequent year on HBO called “The Brink.” And now he has a new collection of personal essays called “No Land’s Man.” Let’s take a brief mangle afterwards we’ll speak some more. This is FRESH AIR.

(MUSIC)

GROSS: This is FRESH AIR. And if you’re customarily fasten us, my guest is Aasif Mandvi. He’s a match on “The Daily Show” and author of a new collection of personal essays called “No Land’s Man.” So your relatives had an organised marriage, which, we know, to many Americans we consider customarily sounds so, like, remote and old-fashioned. And I’m wondering if there was this, like, outrageous opening between a suspicion of regretful and voluptuous adore and sex before matrimony that people of your generation, we know, on a whole in America allow to. So a opening between that and what your relatives knowledge and what maybe they hoped for, for you?

MANDVI: Yeah. From my parent’s era a suspicion was not that matrimony was about some kind of idealized, regretful love. It was a partnership. It’s about formulating family. It’s about formulating offspring. It’s about, we know, Indian enlightenment is radically many some-more of a we culture. It’s a village enlightenment where we do what’s best for a village – we procreate. And afterwards in America, we have this kind of individualism, this, we know – and in a West, essentially, we have this individualism – this suspicion of my possess personal fulfillment. And there’s this existential predicament in America and in a West of, like – who am I? – formed on this acid for particular fulfillment, that we don’t indispensably have in a East in a same approach since you’re kind of told what to do. I’m not observant one is improved than a other, I’m customarily observant that’s just, like, a reality. So, we know, we do find a lot of your time in a West kind of acid for your place in a universe – your voice, your identity, like, who am I? Like, what is my reason for being here, we know? And in that same approach who am we to be partnered with, we know?

GROSS: So you’re not married and we don’t have children, right?

MANDVI: (Laughter) Having pronounced all that of march it stands to reason that I’m not married or have children.

(LAUGHTER)

GROSS: So you’re a sum disaster is what I’m removing to.

MANDVI: Yes. It is mocking that it doesn’t matter how successful we am in any other capacity. Ultimately, my relatives pen is do we have a wife? And do we have children? You know, that is this arrange of – like, we remember my mom she’s upheld on now, but…

GROSS: Oh, I’m sorry. we didn’t know that.

MANDVI: Oh, well, appreciate you. She, we know, adult until she died, she was, like, it was literally, like, she was, like, demeanour we have – you’re on television. You’ve finished a thing that we wanted to do, now don’t we consider we can now get married? Doesn’t that give we adequate reason to now wish to get married? You know, and so that was unequivocally customarily a thing that she always – and my father continues with that review to this day. Like, that is a thing that would eventually arrange of be, we guess, in some way, a fulfilment of whatever a American dream is. You know, to have that mom and kids and a picket fence.

GROSS: It’s infrequently unequivocally tough to live your life a approach we wish to live it with a feeling somehow that you’re unequivocally murdering your relatives by doing that. Like, we are violation their hearts each day.

MANDVI: Right, right. You know, we mean, demeanour we consider family dynamics are unequivocally unequivocally interesting. And in my box my sister did get married. She gave my relatives a grandchild.

GROSS: You’re off a hook. (Laughter).

MANDVI: And so in some ways for many years we was off a hook, yeah, we know. When my niece was innate after that their courtesy was focused on that and she did that. You know, that was in a family that’s what she did. we went off and chased this dream and this career that unequivocally other few people in our, we know, in my family, though even culturally were doing. You know, and arrange of became rather successful during it and found a voice in that. And so, like, we know, like, for me it was like infrequently we felt we consider that, like, my parents, like, had a grandchild on one palm and afterwards we took them to unequivocally good parties with famous people.

(LAUGHTER)

GROSS: Well, I’m sure…

MANDVI: And they got to accommodate Bill Clinton since of me. You know, so that was, like, my, like – we attempted to use that as, like, we know, as my thing of, like, OK this is what we did, right? You met a president, we know.

GROSS: (Laughter) That’s a flattering vast deal.

MANDVI: You might have a grandchild, though we introduced we to Bill Clinton, we know.

GROSS: Has your father started conversations by observant to strangers ever watch “The Daily Show?”

MANDVI: Yes all a time. Well, that’s a thing, right? So, like, we know, as many as they wanted me to get married they constantly speak about my – and they’re unequivocally proud, we know, of a success. And my son is on “The Daily Show” and, we know, and when my mom was in a sanatorium it was like everybody on a building – each nurse, each alloy in that sanatorium – knew that she was a mom of Aasif Mandvi on “The Daily Show.” Like, she finished certain that everybody knew that, we know? So, yeah, they were very, we know, clearly unequivocally unapproachable and happy for my success, though still would adore that grandchild.

GROSS: So when we started acting, before we unequivocally determined who we were, and before, like, “The Daily Show” unequivocally helped we settle that, we were offering – my clarity is from your book – we were offering a lot of, we know, monotonous parts. So what were some of a monotonous parts?

MANDVI: Well, we know, we mean, it was this arrange of normal kind of, we know, cabdrivers, we know, a deli guy, we know. And we also would get – one of a initial auditions we had in New York was for a blurb where we had to go in and try-out to be a lizard charmer.

GROSS: Yeah, so what was a context of that?

MANDVI: It was some kind of – it was possibly some bank blurb or something where they wanted a male desirable a snake. It was kind of customarily a bit in this commercial. And so they had me come in. But we remember they wanted to know if we indeed knew how to lizard charm.

GROSS: (Laughter).

MANDVI: And we wanted a pursuit so badly that we pronounced well, we know, I’m Indian, so it’s substantially in my DNA. we could substantially figure it out. But, we know, ’cause we was so unfortunate and they wanted to know if we owned a turban since they didn’t unequivocally have someone who knew how to tie a turban. And afterwards we consider we pronounced something like no we don’t possess a turban since if we do possess a turban, we kind of don’t leave home though it. You know, we wear it. It’s not, we know, – so we didn’t get a part.

GROSS: Did we ever indeed see a finished blurb on TV?

MANDVI: we consider we did, yeah, and it was a white male who was arrange of swarthy looking and, we know, and we speak about it in a book. we say, we know, he was swarthy looking, bobbing his conduct from side to side doing this extended Indian accent, not worrying during all about what his relatives would consider of him.

GROSS: Right.

MANDVI: Just putting that income in a bank.

GROSS: One of a good things about family is that mostly a relatives are unequivocally broke by what a children are doing and a children are unequivocally broke by what a relatives were doing. So is it annoying to we when your relatives would indicate out who we were? Or did we feel like we wanted to share your celebrity with them and any approach that we could share it was a good thing?

MANDVI: we accepted since they indispensable to do it. Sometimes it was embarrassing, we know, since a misfortune thing is when, we know, my mom or even my father would say, like, do we ever watch “The Daily Show” with Jon Stewart? And afterwards a chairman would be like we don’t watch that. And afterwards they would – good he’s on that show. And afterwards they’d be like, oh. And afterwards they’d be – he is a match on a daily – and I’d be like father they don’t watch a show. So now a review now has to end. They don’t watch it. They don’t know what you’re articulate about. Like, it doesn’t – though they would continue on as if a chairman was like, I’m a vast fan, we know. And they would be like he is on a daily – and afterwards they would start reciting – a movie. Did we see this movie? Nope never seen it, and afterwards it starts to turn annoying ’cause afterwards you’re like, they have no suspicion who we am. To them, I’m customarily this Indian guy, we know?

GROSS: Aasif Mandvi, it’s been good to speak with you. Thank we so much.

MANDVI: Thank you. It’s been great.

GROSS: Aasif Mandvi is a match for “The Daily Show” and a author of a new collection of personal essays “No Land’s Man.” You can review a section on a website freshair.npr.org. Coming up, a tech contributor, Alexis Madrigal, has some recommendation for formulating secure passwords for many websites though carrying to memorize lots of tip difference and numbers. This is FRESH AIR. Transcript supposing by NPR, Copyright NPR.

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