A bequest of loyalty to school, church and nation 93-year-old Winifred …

August 4, 2015 - accent chair

A bequest of loyalty to school, church and nation 93-year-old Winifred Grivich still stands high in many locals' memory

A bequest of loyalty to school, church and nation 93-year-old Winifred Grivich still stands high in many locals’ memory

A bequest of loyalty to school, church and nation 93-year-old Winifred Grivich still stands high in many locals' memory

A bequest of loyalty to school, church and nation 93-year-old Winifred Grivich still stands high in many locals’ memory



Posted: Tuesday, Aug 4, 2015 7:01 am

A bequest of loyalty to school, church and nation 93-year-old Winifred Grivich still stands high in many locals’ memory

By Cathy Cabrera Special to The Item

The Huntsville Item

Winifred Grivich sits by a window in her section during Huntsville’s Creekside Retirement Community. She watches a span of bluebirds flit in and out of a birdhouse outward her window. A list in front of her chair displays a black and white print of Winifred and her husband, Nick, only before he left for France during World War II.

Grivich’s prophesy might be dark a bit by unwell eyesight, yet a memories of her life’s work with Nick sojourn clear. Together, they prepared hundreds of Texas children in a total career that spanned some-more than 65 years.

Mary Winifred Corley, as she was famous as a child, always desired school. She graduated in 1939 as valedictorian from Midway High School in Midway, Texas, and began her beginner year that tumble during Sam Houston State Teachers College. She met a immature male on campus one day during a Estill Library. His accent sounded opposite from her East Texas drawl. When Winifred asked him where he was from, he replied jokingly, “Alaska.” She told him she was from “Mexico.” It was a commencement of a 62-year partnership.

Nick Grivich was a first-generation American. His relatives had immigrated to America from a Austro-Hungarian Empire, now Croatia, in 1913 and had staid on a iron-ore operation of northern Minnesota. Nick followed his cousin to Sam Houston where he warranted a Bachelor of Business Administration in 1940.

After a fight pennyless out, Nick enlisted in a U.S. Army, and a integrate married on Dec 23, 1942, during a weekend leave. He served with a 11th Armored Division in France and Germany, eventually rising to a arrange of captain.

During his absence, Winifred, who is 93 now, took a mangle from college, lived with her relatives and worked as a clergyman during Midway Elementary School. In those days, teachers were not compulsory to have college degrees.

When Nick was strictly liberated from a Army in 1945, a integrate returned to Sam Houston for her to finish her grade mandate and for him to pursue a master’s degree. They lived in an aged fort section on 19th Street that had been altered from a POW stay determined during a war. Joining them during Sam Houston was Winifred’s brother, Larry Corley. The 3 graduated on a same night in 1948.

“My grandparents were so anxious to have 3 family members connoisseur in a aged Greek Theatre that night,” recalls Winifred’s daughter, Leanne Woodward, one of a couple’s 3 children.

Nick began his career in preparation as a clergyman and football manager in Liberty, Texas. From there, he and Winifred altered to Elkhart, where he worked teaching, coaching, and afterwards apropos high propagandize principal. In 1956, a integrate along with their 3 children, Pat, Leanne, and Julie, altered to Winnie, where Nick became superintendent of a East Chambers ISD.

During all these years, Winifred taught during a facile propagandize level, eventually apropos a reading specialist.

“I started out training anything that indispensable teaching, yet a theme we favourite to learn best was reading,” Winifred said. “If we can’t read, we can’t duty in society. The one thing that gratified me many was removing them set off in a right instruction by training to read.”

Today, students from her early years of training are over 70 years old. Yet many in that age operation — and other younger ones— still remember Mrs. Grivich.

“Once, when we was in Boston, we was holding a design of a church and a immature male came adult and hugged me,” she recalls. “He introduced himself and we remembered him, yet we didn’t commend him. It’s good to see these grown-up kids operative and next like he was, and it’s extraordinary that even yet I’ve grown comparison and have gray hair, they still remember me, even distant divided from home.”

“Mother and Daddy were unequivocally concerned in a communities where they worked,” recalls Woodward. “They worked tough and dedicated their lives to children and a community, and I’m unequivocally unapproachable of that.”

The integrate late from preparation in 1978. At a time, late teachers had no Social Security retirement income, so Nick and Winifred worked another 10 years during a Madisonville Hospital. During this time, they returned to a family plantation in Madison County and built a residence that they would live in until Nick upheld divided in 2004. In 2010, Winifred motionless to pierce to Ella Smither Nursing Home, a foregoer of Creekside Retirement Community.

“Our relatives had a clever work ethic,” recalls Woodward. “Every eventuality during school, they were there. Mom done all a clothes, including costumes for plays. Church was also important, and they were really active there as well. It was school, church and country. All were critical to them. It was a life good lived. A lot of lives were overwhelmed by their tough work and dedication.”


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Tuesday, Aug 4, 2015 7:01 am.

source ⦿ http://www.itemonline.com/news/local_news/a-legacy-of-dedication-to-school-church-and-country-/article_0137e7ea-aa82-5cef-be7f-74e76259b945.html

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